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The Maritime Disciplinary Court of the Netherlands:
 

Focal Points Vessel categorisation > Multi Purpose General Cargo vessel > 3000 gt

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Vessel construction, layout and equipment

Stability [1]

Include stability calculations with higher GM values in the Cargo Securing Manual.

Accident and damage prevention

Cargo preparation = stowage plan / stability / lashings (CSM) [1]

In a ship design with containers (partly) outside the hull and expected green water, it is recommended to leave the stackoutside the hull free.

Navigation

The master’s role [2]

Because of his or her knowledge of the situation at the location, the pilot advises the captain on how to navigate. In many ports it is customary for the pilot to give the commands. However, the captain remains ultimately responsible and should fulfil this responsibility by keeping a clear overview of manoeuvring so that he can intervene immediately if necessary.
The Disciplinary Court wishes to emphasize the responsibility and "overriding authority" of the master. The Disciplinary Court increasingly sees the pressure of shipowners and/or charterers being exerted on the master. The master is the person who can oversee the situation on board and who takes the decisions and is responsible for them. The master must of course defend his decision with arguments to the interested parties (authorities, pilot, shipowner, etc.). The master must always bear in mind that a shipowner is not setting out to cause an accident, which will usually cost many times more than the savings that the shipowner has in mind if, for example, he presses to depart earlier from a port.

Bridge orders/alerting the master [2]

If an officer on watch absolutely must go to the toilet, he must ensure in advance that it is safe to do so and that an adequate watch is maintained during his absence.
If an officer of the watch is unable to carry out his duties (temporarily) due to illness, he must immediately arrange for a replacement.

Voyage planning & preparation [1]

Category Zones of Confidence indicates the accuracy of the hydrographic data on the chart. The CATZOC table shows the position accuracy, depth accuracy and survey quality of each ZOC value. A misconception is that buoys, drilling rigs and other obstacles are indicated with the same accuracy as the position accuracy in the ZOC table. The accuracy of these objects depends on data provided by third parties to the UK Hydrographic Office. Mistakes regularly creep in. A common inaccuracy is that mistakes are made with degrees, minutes, seconds and degrees, minutes and tenths of minutes.

The Disciplinary Court wishes to point out that any seafarer who observes a position error of a drilling platform or any other object can report this to the UK Hydrographic Office by means of a Hydrographic Note (see NP 100, there is even a separate app developed for this: the Admiralty H-Note; this can be downloaded from the IOS and Android App store).

Use of electronic and other navigation aids [2]

The Disciplinary Court advises bridge teams to use both radar systems if the vessel is equipped with an X-band and S-band. Due to the different properties of both systems, objects can come through better on the one system than on the other. This includes Racon signals and objects in a shower. Furthermore, a comparison of the two radar systems can provide a better interpretation of the data obtained from the systems.

The Disciplinary Court advises bridge teams to use both radar systems if the vessel is equipped with an X-band and S-band. Due to the different properties of both systems, objects can come through better on the one system than on the other. This includes Racon signals and objects in a shower. Furthermore, a comparison of the two radar systems can provide a better interpretation of the data obtained from the systems.

Limitations of electronic and other means of navigation [1]

When sailing in areas such as Chinese waters, where every fishing buoy is fitted with AIS, it is tempting to think that every dangerous object is fitted with AIS. The Disciplinary Court wishes to point out that this is not a safe assumption. There are also many objects in the oil industry that have no power supply, are unlit and do not have AIS. There are also many small and even large ships around the world that do not have AIS or have AIS turned off.

Manoeuvring [1]

Because of his or her knowledge of the situation at the location, the pilot advises the captain on how to navigate. In many ports it is customary for the pilot to give the commands. However, the captain remains ultimately responsible and should fulfil this responsibility by keeping a clear overview of manoeuvring so that he can intervene immediately if necessary.

Sailing under pilotage [1]

Because of his or her knowledge of the situation at the location, the pilot advises the captain on how to navigate. In many ports it is customary for the pilot to give the commands. However, the captain remains ultimately responsible and should fulfil this responsibility by keeping a clear overview of manoeuvring so that he can intervene immediately if necessary.

Sailing in an ice convoy with an icebreaker [4]

Sufficient manpower on the bridge and a clear division of tasks with regard to navigation, steering and keeping an eye on the distance to the other vessels.
Active communication between the vessels in the convoy.
The use of a variable range marker (VRM) and AIS data in the radar.
Crew members who are competent in ice convoy sailing, for example by taking an appropriate course.

Carrying out the work

Alarmeringen [1]

The manuals on board should include how to deal with the bilge alarm from a hold.

Bunkering/ oil spill prevention [1]

When it is not clear what is leaking, this liquid should not be pumped overboard, as safety dictates it should be pumped into the ballast tank on board of the vessel if possible.